Thursday, April 25, 2013

Find out the current value of your home HERE! - "Quick & Easy"

You will receive this information quickly, by email and without having to speak with an agent!

Complete the required information on your home and you will receive a complimentary Computer Analysis indicating your home's approximate present value on the market today.
Simple...Automated...Dependable...


Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Fargo Home Buyer Alert: What is a credit score.



Our credit score can mean the difference between being denied or approved for credit, and a low or high interest rate. A good score can help you qualify for an apartment rental and even help you get utilities connected without a deposit.

So what is it?

Your credit score is a three-digit number generated by a mathematical algorithm using information in your credit report. It's designed to predict risk, specifically, the likelihood that you will become seriously delinquent on your credit obligations in the 24 months after scoring.
There are a multitude of credit-scoring models in existence, but there's one that dominates the market: the FICO credit score. According to myFICO.com, the consumer website for the FICO score developer, "90 percent of all financial institutions in the U.S. use FICO scores in their decision-making process."
FICO scores range from 300 to 850, where a higher number indicates lower risk. What's a good score?
A consumer has three FICO scores, one for each credit report provided by the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Unfortunately, consumers currently have access to only their Equifax and TransUnion FICO scores. Experian ended its agreement with myFICO.com in 2009.
What goes into a credit score?
Data from your credit report goes into five major categories that make up a FICO score. The scoring model weighs some factors more heavily, such as payment history and debt owed.

Payment history: (35 percent) -- Your account payment information, including any delinquencies and public records.
Amounts owed: (30 percent) -- How much you owe on your accounts. The amount of available credit you're using on revolving accounts is heavily weighted.

Length of credit history: (15 percent) -- How long ago you opened accounts and time since account activity.
Types of credit used: (10 percent) -- The mix of accounts you have, such as revolving and installment.
New credit: (10 percent) -- Your pursuit of new credit, including credit inquiries and number of recently opened accounts.
Personal or demographic information such as age, race, address, marital status, income and employment don't affect the score.

Different score impact for same missteps
How much does a specific change affect a credit score? The answer is usually "it depends," and for good reason. Credit score developers don't reveal the exact point deductions. The weight of any given activity can also vary for different credit histories.

Within a scoring model, there's more than one formula used to calculate a score, and each formula is designed for a category of consumers with similar credit profiles. The information in your credit report determines which formula is used. If you are new to credit, for instance, the scoring model will put you into a category for people with young credit histories, and use a scoring formula specific to that group. Such groups are called scorecards. Within that group, recent inquiries may cost more points than they would for a different group.

How to check your credit score

Federal law mandates the consumer's right to a free credit report annually from each credit reporting agency, but not to a free credit score. Use our FICO score estimator to get your score range free of charge. To get your exact number, you have to purchase it from a score provider, such as myFICO.com or one of the reporting agencies.

Saturday, March 30, 2013

20 Signs You Need a Financial Makeover

1. You charge group dinners on your card and keep your friends’ cash to spend. I actually don’t mind doing this myself as it saves me a trip to the ATM if I need the cash, but if you’re just being stupid and thinking it’s “free money” to go and blow anytime then yeah – you need a financial makeover.

2. You spend more than 40% of your total income on rent. The last time I calculated this we were spending 37% of our total (net) income on mortgages. And I’ll admit it’s not very savvy. But I’ll also point out that we got ourselves into this BEFORE Mr. J. Money came about ;) So I agree with this one here – ya gotta keep your rent/mortgages way below that 40% line.

 3. You’re constantly transferring your balance to get 0% interest on your credit card debt. Bad if you don’t know what you’re doing, but good if you’re Jonathan from My Money Blog (the expert in xfering $20,000+ and milking the extra hundreds of dollars in interest every year;)

4. You pay off one credit card with another. Yes, BAD!!

5. Less than 10% of your income goes to your retirement savings. (Or worse, zero percent!) I wouldn’t say you need a total makeover if you were saving 10% really, even though everyone would love to see you saving 15% or even 25%, but definitely saving 0% is a troubling sign.

 6. You have a credit card that doesn’t give you anything in return, like cash back or airline miles. Haha…well this isn’t the worst thing in the world, but it is a good idea to check and makes sure you’re getting *something* in return for doing nothing ;) You don’t have to do anything different than you’re doing now!

7. You don’t know what IRA means outside of Ireland. (is that supposed to be a joke?)

8. You pay the minimum balance on your credit card each month.Not the best habit to get into, that’s for sure. If at all possible you should be adding in at least $25-$50 more every month to help knock it away as fast as you can. I once paid $2,000 for a $1,200 computer back in the day because I kept just telling myself “I’ll do it tomorrow.” Make tomorrow, today!

9. You don’t open your credit card statement because you can’t bear to see how high the balance is. Oh yeah, definitely not a good sign. You HAVE TO KNOW what you’re dealing with so that you can fix it and get right back on track! And this goes for savings and investments too. If you don’t KNOW what’s going on you’ll just keep sinking and sinking until it takes something tragic to snap you out of it.

10. You don’t keep receipts because they remind you of what you’ve spent. Haha…that’s actually pretty clever ;) STUPID, but clever. Maybe these people should switch to debit cards instead? (I’m assuming they’re using credit cards which allow them to spend way more than they have due to credit limits and such. With debit cards though, you have a breaking point! Once you hit $0.00 you can’t pick up anything else.)

 11. You know your company has a 401k plan, but you have no idea what that is. My favorite tool ever! Just call up HR real quick (right now, actually, stop reading this!!) and ask how much your company matches. Then, tell your sweet old HR lady (or man) that you’d like to contribute that exact same # and make sure to fill out whatever forms you need to do ASAP. Even if you never look at it again, that one move you just made will hook you up years and years to come. So do it!

 12. You withdraw cash frequently from ATM’s that aren’t affiliated with your bank. I don’t know if this one applies as much as maybe it used to. Many banks now reimburse you for your fees so it doesn’t matter where you go (at least online banks do – like my fave USAA, baby!)

13. The number of credit cards in your wallet is higher than the number of dates you’ve had this year. Hahahhahaa…..didn’t see that one coming :)

14. You buy so much on eBay that they’ve awarded you VIP status. Wha wha wha….

15. You want to start a savings account, but then sale season starts again! Is it me or are these going down hill?

16. You don’t have an emergency fund to pay bills should you lose your job. Back in action! YES, emergency funds are KEY to any financial game plan. Whether it’s $100, or $1,000, be sure to be stashing some aside for when you least expect it!

17. Your monthly extra cell phone minute charges are bigger than your monthly electric bill. (I had to go look up my own electric bill to see if this is a good gauge or not, and indeed I think it may. Although if we’re talking about overall cell phone bills and not just “minute charges” then the iPhone kills us!)

18. You overdraw on your checking account more than once a year. Hmmm… once is kinda strict. I’d say not more than 3 times a year cuz sometimes weird things just happen. Although if you were really on top of it you’d sign up for overdraft protection (the kinds that don’t cost you any money!) so that you’d be safe just in case you got a little crazy here and there.

19. You live paycheck to paycheck. This should be the #1 sign you need a makeover, hands down. Living paycheck to paycheck is a recipe for disaster, and I know 80% of you reading this right now are in this boat :( I was too!!! For 25 years of my life! If you haven’t been serious about making a change, please start today. There are plenty of ways you can get yourself in better position, you just have to get on it and really commit. Start tracking your money and finding where all your spending leaks are! Picking up a hustle on the side will help too.

 20. You spend more on new shoes annually than you save. Oh wow, that would not be good. I think I’ve spent around $200 so far on shoes this year – and 2 of those were on new cleats that needed replacing. I would punch myself in the face if I was saving less than that every year :(

 Were any of you surprised with your answers to some of these? Did it get you to double check and see if you’re truly on track or not? Again, some of these were pretty crazy and more entertaining than anything, but hopefully it moved a few marbles upstairs and will prompt you to start researching any areas that may need improvement. It’s always a work in progress :)

Source

Friday, March 29, 2013

Take Charge When Buying a Home

If you approach the home buying process intelligently and with confidence, you are much more likely to emerge with a house you'll be proud to call home.

Approaching the task of buying your next home can be overwhelming. There's so much to consider.

How much house can I afford, and how can I find the best loan? Where will I come up with a down payment, and how much will I need? Should I buy a new or resale home, and which will go up in value? Should I use an agent or look at homes on my own?

And these questions are just the beginning. Buying a home is one of the largest financial transactions in your lifetime, yet we don't teach about it in school. You're just supposed to pick it up along the way.

Well, as you start down this road, let me give you a little advice. Here are the two most important things to remember no matter where you are on the road to ownership:

1. You can and should understand everything that is happening in the home buying process. There is nothing, and I mean nothing, that is so complex that it can't be easily explained to anyone with average intelligence, and you've got more than that. Just because we don't apply for a thirty year mortgage once a week doesn't mean we have to take the first one that comes along. You'll need to learn some new terms, apply some new concepts and take the time to understand what you're getting into. If anything happens at any point in the process that doesn't make sense to you, simply demand a full and complete explanation. If it still doesn't make sense, seek help from someone you trust like your CPA, your banker or maybe your friendly online real estate columnist.

2. In the world of real estate sales, YOU are the most important person in the entire process. It's easy to think that everyone else carries more weight than you. The agent talks fast and has an answer for everything. The lender may decline your loan application, and on and on. But the truth is that you, the buyer, are the one person in this transaction that makes it all happen. If you decide to not buy, the entire process comes to a grinding halt. So flex your consumer muscle and take command of this process. Surround yourself with a team of professionals that you have confidence in and make them work for you.

If you plan from the beginning to approach the home buying process intelligently and with confidence, you are much more likely to emerge at the end of the day with a house you'll be proud to call home, and the knowledge that you made the right decision.

Source:

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Home Prices Rise at Fastest Pace in Over Six Years

Home-price appreciation is accelerating in much of the U.S., offering the latest confirmation that the housing market is turning after the most severe property downturn since the Great Depression.

Prices rose by 8.1% in January from a year earlier, the largest such gain in 6½ years, according to figures from the S&P/Case-Shiller index of home prices in 20 major metropolitan cities released Tuesday. All 20 cities posted annual increases.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Buying A Home Plan for Younger People – Make Sure to Plan Ahead

Granted, few young people spend much time day-dreaming about buying their first home. They're naturally preoccupied with academics, athletics, parties, dating and future career possibilities. Nonetheless, there are a number of good reasons to start learning early in life about the costs of buying a home and the responsibilities of homeownership. For example, a college student's misuse or abuse of credit cards can preclude his or her buying a home later on.

Here are five recommendations for young people who want to position themselves for homeownership:

1. Establish good credit habits and a favorable credit history. Get a credit card and use it responsibly. Apply for an automobile loan and make your payments on time every month. If you're renting an apartment, put your own name on the lease and the utility bills and make sure the rent and the bills are paid every month. If you're already struggling with credit card debt or have large student loans, take a free workshop from the non-profit Consumer Credit Counseling Service. Call (800) 388-2227 for information.

2. Start saving for a down payment and closing costs. It's possible to purchase a first home in many parts of the country without much in the way of savings. But in high-cost housing areas, starting to save early can be enormously beneficial because you'll get the advantage of compounding interest and have a longer period of time to grow your investments. Open a savings account or a stock brokerage investment account and make regular deposits.

3. Read some books. Your local library and bookstore probably have at least a few shelves of books about financial management and buying a home. Take notes. Make a financial plan for yourself.

4. Research where you'd like to live. Many young people assume they'll continue living in their own home town when they get older, but people are more mobile than ever and chances are good you'll one day live in another city or even another state. Again, the library, bookstore and Web can be excellent resources for information about housing costs and homeownership opportunities around the country.

5. Tap your real estate agent relatives for advice. Parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles or older cousins in the real estate business can give you good information about the cost of housing in the area where you want to live and what it takes to buy a home. Questions to ask: Is housing affordable in this area? How much money would I need to save in order to buy a home? What advice would you give me about planning my financial future? Would you recommend some books that I might like to read about buying a home? Don't be shy. If you have a question, ask someone in a position to know the answer.

Source:

Thursday, March 21, 2013

How Much Money Do I Have to Save to Buy A Home?

The first thing to understand about buying a house is that you don't have to have all the cash saved up in order to make your purchase.

The good news is that there are lots of folks out there who are very interested in lending you as much as 95% of the purchase price of your home, at very favorable interest rates. Furthermore, they are willing to spread out the payments over a long period of time so that you can afford the house you want.

Just to cover the basics, let's elaborate on the points in the last paragraph:

If you have a steady job and a reasonable credit history, there is a good chance that you can find a home lender who will lend you most of the purchase price of your new house. Home loans are also called "mortgages," which comes from a Latin phrase meaning "pledge unto death." While lenders don't take your promise to pay quite that seriously, they DO expect to get repaid on time. Just to make sure you remember, lenders take an ownership interest in your house until the loan is paid in full.

Home loans typically are offered in amounts of 80%, 90% and 95% of the price you are paying for the house. You are expected to pay the remaining amount in cash from your own savings. As you might imagine, the lower percentage loans are somewhat easier to qualify for.

The reason the lender is willing to lend you up to 95% of the value of your house is that history has shown real estate to be such an excellent investment. Lenders expect that your home will be worth more in the future than it is today - so their investment in your home is considered very safe.

That's also why the interest rate you can obtain on a home loan is one of the best around. Consider that America's largest and strongest corporations borrow at what is called the "prime rate," and that today you can borrow a home loan - fixed at the same rate for many years - at substantially less than the prime rate. Lenders have found that home loans tend to be excellent investments, and you benefit every month when you make your loan payment.

Finally, home loans are available to be repaid over terms of usually 15 or 30 years. The shorter term loan offers a slightly lowered interest rate, so if you can afford the higher monthly payments, you'll save in interest costs by choosing the 15 year loan. At today's interest rates, a 15 year loan costs about 27% more than a 30 year loan in terms of your monthly payment. But the amazing thing is that lenders are even willing to offer a fixed rate loan for that time period. It's better financing than you can get on just about any other investment.

Source:

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Understand Your Credit - Find out about your credit and correct any errors now!

Thinking about buying a house? Then think about your credit history...the folks who lend money do!

How well you have handled your credit obligations in the past is of utmost importance to lenders today. The good news is that this information, for the most part, is available to you.

Your credit history is maintained by three different private companies called credit reporting agencies: Equifax, TransUnion and Experian. Their websites and phone numbers are listed at the end of this article. Everyone can pull their own credit once a year for free at annualcreditreport.com. If you’ve already done that or need to pull it again. You can order your report by phone and charge it to your major credit card if you like. It usually takes about a week to arrive. You can even order your report online directly from each of the three agencies, but they have to verify your identity before you can obtain any private information. By the way, avoid services that offer to obtain all your reports for you in exchange for a fee. You want the information directly from the reporting agency, blemishes and all.

It's a good idea to get a copy of all three reports, because if an error exists on even one of the reports, it may negatively affect your chances of getting the loan you want. Your credit report lists all the consumer credit that has been extended to you over the past seven years. It will show what your highest balance has been and what your current balance was on the date last reported by the creditor. It will also show how many payments you made on time and how many late payments were late. Late payments are grouped into categories showing how late you were. For example, if your credit card payment was over 30 days late one time, it might not be considered too serious. But if payments were over 60 days late four times, over 120 days late two times and over 180 days late one time, you have had a serious problem. That problem is going to impact your ability to borrow money.

It just makes sense to find out about your credit and correct any errors now. Regardless of how many credit problems you have had in the past, there are two good points to remember.

First, negative credit information can be reported in your credit file for only seven years. After that, it drops out and cannot even be considered. The one exception is bankruptcy, which can be reported for 10 years. But after that you start with essentially a clean slate.

Second, lenders are much more concerned about how you have handled your credit recently than with what happened several years ago. Even if you have had a bankruptcy, if you have kept your nose clean and paid your bills on time since then, it is possible you could qualify for a loan after as little as two or three years.

One of the best developments in the world of lending has been risk-based pricing. That's a five dollar term for the ability of lenders to offer higher priced loans to borrowers based on their demonstrated ability to repay. In other words, even if you have slightly fractured credit, you can still likely get a loan. It just may cost you a little more.

Equifax (www.equifax.com) can be reached at 800-997-2493. TransUnion (www.transunion.com) can be reached at 800-888-4213. Experian (www.experian.com) can be reached at 888-397-3742.

Source:

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Calculate Your Income Vs. Debt

Most lenders don't want you to take out a loan that will overload your ability to repay everybody you owe.

As you think about applying for a home loan, you need to consider your personal finances. How much you earn versus how much you owe will likely determine how much a lender will allow you to borrow.

First, determine your gross monthly income. This will include any regular and recurring income that you can document. Unfortunately, if you can't document the income or it doesn't show up on your tax return, then you can't use it to qualify for a loan. However, you can use unearned sources of income such as alimony or lottery payoffs. And if you own income-producing assets such as real estate or stocks, the income from those can be estimated and used in this calculation. If you have questions about your specific situation, any good loan officer can review the rules.

Next, calculate your monthly debt load. This includes all monthly debt obligations like credit cards, installment loans, car loans, personal debts or any other ongoing monthly obligation like alimony or child support. If it is revolving debt like a credit card, use the minimum monthly payment for this calculation. If it is installment debt, use the current monthly payment to calculate your debt load. And you don't have to consider a debt at all if it is scheduled to be paid off in less than six months. Add all this up and it is a figure we'll call your monthly debt service.

In a nutshell, most lenders don't want you to take out a loan that will overload your ability to repay everybody you owe. Although every lender has slightly different formulas, here is a rough idea of how they look at the numbers.

Typically, your monthly housing expense, including monthly payments for taxes and insurance, should not exceed about 28% of your gross monthly income. If you don't know what your tax and insurance expense will be, you can estimate that about 15% of your payment will go toward this expense. The remainder can be used for principal and interest repayment.

In addition, your proposed monthly housing expense and your total monthly debt service combined cannot exceed about 36% of your gross monthly income. If it does, your application may exceed the lender's underwriting guidelines and your loan may not be approved.

Depending on your individual situation, there may be more or less flexibility in the 28% and 36% guidelines. For example, if you are able to buy the home while borrowing less than 80% of the home's value by making a large cash down payment, the qualifying ratios become less critical. Likewise, if Bill Gates or a rich uncle is willing to cosign on the loan with you, lenders will be much less focused on the guidelines discussed here.

Remember that there are hundreds of loan programs available in today's lending market and every one of them has different guidelines. So don't be discouraged if your dream home seems out of reach.

In addition, there are a number of factors within your control which affect your monthly payment. For example, you might choose to apply for an adjustable rate loan which has a lower initial payment than a fixed rate program. Likewise, a larger down payment has the effect of lowering your projected monthly payment.

Just plan on contacting and investigating a number of lenders to find a loan program that meets your needs.

Source:

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Making the Transition from Renting to Buying

Most lenders don't want you to take out a loan that will overload your ability to repay everybody you owe.  

As you think about applying for a home loan, you need to consider your personal finances. How much you earn versus how much you owe will likely determine how much a lender will allow you to borrow.  

First, determine your gross monthly income. This will include any regular and recurring income that you can document. Unfortunately, if you can't document the income or it doesn't show up on your tax return, then you can't use it to qualify for a loan. However, you can use unearned sources of income such as alimony or lottery payoffs. And if you own income-producing assets such as real estate or stocks, the income from those can be estimated and used in this calculation. If you have questions about your specific situation, any good loan officer can review the rules.  

Next, calculate your monthly debt load. This includes all monthly debt obligations like credit cards, installment loans, car loans, personal debts or any other ongoing monthly obligation like alimony or child support. If it is revolving debt like a credit card, use the minimum monthly payment for this calculation. If it is installment debt, use the current monthly payment to calculate your debt load. And you don't have to consider a debt at all if it is scheduled to be paid off in less than six months. Add all this up and it is a figure we'll call your monthly debt service.  

In a nutshell, most lenders don't want you to take out a loan that will overload your ability to repay everybody you owe. Although every lender has slightly different formulas, here is a rough idea of how they look at the numbers.  

Typically, your monthly housing expense, including monthly payments for taxes and insurance, should not exceed about 28% of your gross monthly income. If you don't know what your tax and insurance expense will be, you can estimate that about 15% of your payment will go toward this expense. The remainder can be used for principal and interest repayment.

In addition, your proposed monthly housing expense and your total monthly debt service combined cannot exceed about 36% of your gross monthly income. If it does, your application may exceed the lender's underwriting guidelines and your loan may not be approved.  

Depending on your individual situation, there may be more or less flexibility in the 28% and 36% guidelines. For example, if you are able to buy the home while borrowing less than 80% of the home's value by making a large cash down payment, the qualifying ratios become less critical. Likewise, if Bill Gates or a rich uncle is willing to cosign on the loan with you, lenders will be much less focused on the guidelines discussed here.  

 Remember that there are hundreds of loan programs available in today's lending market and every one of them has different guidelines. So don't be discouraged if your dream home seems out of reach. 

In addition, there are a number of factors within your control which affect your monthly payment. For example, you might choose to apply for an adjustable rate loan which has a lower initial payment than a fixed rate program. Likewise, a larger down payment has the effect of lowering your projected monthly payment.   Just plan on contacting and investigating a number of lenders to find a loan program that meets your needs.   Source:

Friday, March 8, 2013

Make Moorhead Home New Construction Property Tax Rebate Program

 

Instructions:

How do I qualify for the new construction rebate?

To qualify, the property must:
Be located within Moorhead City limits and classified as 1a,1b,2a,4b or 4bb (1-3 unit residential). The classification of your property can be found on your property tax statement or by contacting the City Assessor. The property must be new construction with no part of the structure commenced prior to January 1, 2012. Construction of the property must commence prior to December 31, 2014. Construction is deemed to have commenced if a city building permit has been issued and the mandatory footing or foundation inspection has been completed.

What is the benefit?

For property classified as 1a,1b,2a,4b or 4bb (1-3 unit residential) the rebate is the entire market value of the land and new improvements. The rebate includes the two payable tax years that correspond with the two assessment years after construction commenced.

How does the new construction credit work?

Builders or purchasers of new homes for which construction commenced between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014 are eligible for a rebate of some or all general real estate taxes for the first two years following home construction. There is no minimum or maximum market value limit, and land value is included. Special levies such as school bond referendum, watershed, and economic development are not included in the rebate. Special assessments are not part of the rebate.

What if the residence sells during the rebate period?

Once an application is submitted and approved on a residence, the parcel is eligible for two payable tax years even if the ownership transfers. If the residence is constructed on or before August 31, 2012, I understand my rebate will be smaller than homes built after September 1.
 

Will I get the full amount the second year?

No. Construction activity that began prior to September 1, 2012 is not eligible for the Clay County portion of the tax payments for either year of eligibility. 

When will I get my rebate check?
Tax payments are required to be paid as due on May 15th and October 15th of each year. A rebate of the eligible portion of the tax payments will be mailed by the Clay County Treasurer in December of each year of eligibility. 

How do I apply?

Complete the application and return it to the City Assessor. Completed applications must be returned by January 31 of the year following the commencement of construction. Click here to download Application.

How we use information

The county/city assessor may share the information contained on this form with the County Auditor, County Attorney, Commissioner of Revenue or other federal, state or local authorities to verify your eligibility for the rebate. You do not have to provide this information. However, refusal may disqualify you from consideration for the rebate. 

Penalties 

Making false statements on this application is against the law. Minnesota Statutes, Section 609.41 states that giving false information in order to avoid or reduce their tax obligations can result in a fine up to $3,000 and/or up to one year in prison. 

For more information contact:
City of Moorhead
ATTN: Assessor Dept.
500 Center Avenue
Moorhead MN 56560
(218) 299-5310
Assessor@cityofmoorhead.com

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Seller’s Checklist

• Hire a stager, inspector, photographer and other professionals as needed.
 • Pressure-wash sidewalks and decks.
 • Clean windows.
 • Clear gutters and downspouts.
• Remove weeds; mulch; plant flowers.
 • Clear cobwebs, leaves from porches, patios.
 • Re-grout bathtubs and faucets.
 • Have air conditioning and furnace checked.
 • Paint trim, baseboards and nicks if needed.
 • Clear counters, tables, bookshelves.
• Organize closets and storage areas.
• Clean carpets.
• Ask a friend to give an honest assessment of your home.

Source: Washington Post
For more information on selling your home click here: Selling My Home in the FM Area

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Fargo Buyers Alert: Don't waste your home search time on Zillow,Trulia and Homes.com

Most real estate home buyers are obsessed with finding the next great deal.  So much so that they stay up into the wee hours of the night scouring the internet for properties,  As real estate agents know, our livelihoods depend on the accuracy of the data we analyze and for that reason I’m begging you to PLEASE stop searching for real estate on nationwide portals like Trulia, Zillow and Homes.com - amongst many others!

For the past 12 months brokerage after brokerage has decided to withdrawal their listings from the nationwide real estate search portals citing, among other things, horribly inaccurate information and in some cases outright scams.  

Very Inaccurate Real Estate Search Results
National portals like Trulia and Zilliow are slow to show new listings.  When a property is listed for sale it hits the local MLS in a matter of minutes, usually about 15, but can take as long as 9 days to populate to nationally syndicated sites according to studies on the subject.  To real estate investors ready to pounce 9 days might as well be 3 months.  By the time the home owner sees the listing, sees the property and submits an offer sufficient time will have passed that there could be one or more competitive bids or quite possibly the property could have sold already.  A seasoned real estate agent knows how important timing is and getting all of your real estate listings even 24 hours later than your competitors will cause you to miss out on great deals.  

Bad Data
The real estate company Redfin was hired recently to assess the accuracy of sites like Trulia and Zillow and their study found that approximately 36% of the listings shown as active on Zillow and Trulia were no longer for sale in the local MLS, compared with almost 0% on local brokerage websites.  The study further found that brokerage sourced listings using their local MLS feed displayed 100% of the MLS homes listed for sale on their websites but Trulia only displayed 81% and Zillow 79%.  So let me summarize – over 1/3rd of the listings you are seeing are NOT ACTUALLY FOR SALE and you only get to see 4/5th of the listings that are actually for sale.  LOL.  I could go on but really there’s no need.  Obviously anyone searching for properties in a city would like to have access to all of the listings that are for sale and none of the ones that aren’t.  

What’s My House Worth? (Don’t Ask Zillow)
I considered writing an entire post of the accuracy…or inaccuracy, of real estate portal pricing tools like the famed Zillow Zestimate.  For those who aren’t familiar with Zillow the website offers an opinion of a listed house value called a Zestimate and it is prominently displayed on each property’s listing page.  Sounds great right?  Unfortunately the Zestimate values aren’t even close to the actual values that the properties sell for.  If you’re wondering how I can be so sure it’s because, to Zillow’s credit, they actually publicize the accuracy of their Zestimates city by city. To measure the accuracy of the Zestimate Zillow compares the actual home sale prices of homes with their Zestimate and they’ve found that the Zesimtate is within 5% of the actual sale price around 33% of the time and within 10% of the sale price around 50% of the time.  What To Do? For real estate home buyers in need of accurate and timely data national search portals like Trulia and Zillow are not as reliable as other options available.  Instead of searching for properties on these websites real estate investors should focus on smaller, local brokerage based websites, establish relationships with local real estate agents or get a real estate license and pay to join the local MLS where they invest.  These steps will assure that you are getting the most accurate and up to date information and will give you a competitive advantage over those who are searching for real estate with websites like Trulia and Zillow.

Find out the value of your home from a local real estate professional, using local market data and accurate listing information. Find out your homes value here.  

What do you think? Do you use Trulia or Zillow?

Sunday, March 3, 2013

First Time Home Sellers - Tips!!

Attention first-time home sellers: This is not your father's housing market.
Today's buyer-take-all market is a benefit for buyers with great credit and deep pockets. But sellers are stunned with new realities that include paying (rather than making) money at the closing table, providing extras to sweeten the deal, and spending more time and cash making the home camera-ready.
For first-time sellers who have never been through the process before, it's a different world. One where the value of the house isn't measured in the profit made on the sale, but by the enjoyment the owners had from living in the home.
~Here are some important things experienced sellers would tell you, if they could.
Your largest number of showings will occur in the first two to three weeks. The (multiple listing service) systems and the Internet tend to drive the majority of showings. Many buyers are plugged in electronically. So the minute something new pops up that meets their criteria, they want to see it. Take advantage of that sweet spot by pricing the house competitively right out of the gate. How you style the price is important. For example, a home first marketed at $155,000, then lowering it to $150,000 meant the listing appeared within the computer search parameters that buyers commonly used in that price range. Want to sit with a house that won't move? Be the first-time seller who insists you can get the appraised value, the tax assessor's estimate or whatever you paid a few years ago. It seems like there's no relationship between your assessed value, taxable value and the actual market value of your house. There doesn't seem to be any correlation. The truth is that your house is worth what buyers are willing to pay. No more. This is a true market that is totally based on supply and demand. That means many buyers should be prepared to lose some money or hang onto the home until the price rises. To make your home stand out it may be smart to throw in some incentives, for instance, include the newer washer and dryer knowing that they will be challenging to move anyway and this will "sweeten the deal" for onlooking buyers. Beware the agent who promises big profits, Combs says. That person may just be after your business. Don't go with anyone who doesn't use comps. And study sales prices, not asking prices, for real estate. One question to ask yourself and pose as you interview agents: How will you reach the home's target market? You have to consider who your most likely buyers are for what you're selling and cater to that group of people. Targeting 20-somethings who live on their smartphones? You need to effectively access the networks your buyers are tapping to find their next home. One big trend: QR (or "quick response") bar codes that allow smartphone users to access property information electronically. The typical starter home can also appeal to downsizing empty nesters. To serve their needs, you might also want to have a phone number that instantly reaches someone who can provide details and answer questions. And don't neglect the modern version of curb appeal: using lots of photos on real estate listings' websites. However you market your house, you need a good number of clear, well-lit, professional-quality pictures that show your house at its best. Keeping your house clean is important in every sale. But first-timers are likely selling smaller houses, and clutter can mean the difference between cozy and cramped. Kitchen and bathroom countertops are another hot spot that many sellers forget to clear. The same chaos that represents your normal routine makes your house seem messy, disorganized and uninviting to buyers. However, you don't want to remove all traces of human existence. Decluttering is good. But I'm not a big fan of taking all of your personal stuff out. Don't neutralize it so that it's sterile. Most buyers are lazy. The last thing a new homeowner wants is another 'to-do' list, Ramsey says. So get the home move-in ready before it hits the market so the buyer can start fresh easily. That means making all the repairs and replacements that you would demand if you were buying the house today. If you have to walk single file up the walkway, trim the bushes. If the garage door is dented, have that fixed or replaced. If you go into a room and say, 'Hmm, I wonder if this carpet is dirty enough to replace?' You have your answer. First-time sellers are likely selling smaller, starter homes which are popular with first-time buyers and empty-nesters. Neither group is likely to want to spend weekends tackling the jobs that you avoided. From a presentation standpoint, you want them to feel it's turnkey -- ready to go. Because your competition is doing that. In this market, it's not just a price war but a beauty contest at the same time. If you're looking to spend some money to make your house memorable, ask someone who knows what will improve the market value. You might want to paint a stylish blue kitchen tan -- to match the walls of the adjacent open living room and attract more buyers. The cheapest thing you can do for a house with the biggest bang for the buck is to paint and replace carpet. Recommendation: soft neutrals, which are easy on the eyes and have mass appeal. Fresh carpet and that new-paint smell are also buyer-bait. Buyers don’t generally get emotionally attached to a carpet-allowance sign. What they fall in love with is the new carpet in the house. If you're a first time home seller and would like some direction to get the ball rolling, contact us anytime, we'd be glad to tour your home, give you some tips on getting your home ready to sell and fill you in on the entire selling process including sharing with you all the "extra" services we offer.  We're here to make sure all your questions get answered and that you don't have to go-it alone.  Just call, email or fill out the contact form on the right side of the page and we'll make sure you're selling experience is as stress-free and profitable as possible.  We're experienced full time realtors that work together to ensure you receive only the top notch service that you deserve.
Remember: Not all realtors are alike. You may pay a similar fee to a lot of different realtors, but we at least give you a lot more for your money than a majority of agents would even consider providing for you.  Call us today, even if you're just getting started, we're here to help even in the getting ready stage.  There are no costs to you until your home is listed, sells and closes!

Thursday, February 28, 2013

2013 Parade of Homes Fargo ND

The 2013 Spring Parade of Homes hosted by Home Builders Association of F-M will be April 27-May 5. Company Overview The Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead hosts two Parade events each year, one in the spring and one in the fall. Admission is free. Description The spring Parade, held over nine days, will include homes in a wide range of prices built by HBA of F-M builders, each with his or her own distinct style. Bright yellow and blue directional signs and pennants will mark homes participating in the parade.Hours are 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. weekdays and noon - 5 p.m. weekends.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Find FM Realtors of Fargo Moorhead in Cass County ND


Whether you are a first time buyer or an experienced investor, you will find useful information about how to choose the "right" property, making an offer, negotiating, financing, mortgage rates, moving, and everything involved in making an informed real estate decision in todays market.

Please feel free to browse through this site to explore the Cass County communities, comprehensive online tool offers direct access to the latest properties for sale in the FM Areas. Featuring extensive community information, consumer links, school information, free reports, answers to commonly asked real estate questions, and more, youll find everything about real estate within one easy source at FMRealtors.net.

If you currently own property and are thinking of placing it on the market, this site contains information about preparing your home for sale, selecting the right agent, pricing your home appropriately, marketing it effectively, going through the inspection processes, and receiving a timely market evaluation.

Saturday, June 16, 2012

FM Realtors of Fargo Moorhead





Our Services for Buyers
We take the time to examine exactly what you are looking for in a home. We do a thorough buyer consultation where we get to know what your personal wants and needs are in your next home. We then search through the thousands of homes available for sale to find homes that fit your criteria and send them to you the very FIRST day they go up for sale. This way, you will not miss your perfect home! We then take you on a tour of all the homes that interest you and start the hunt for that home that you walk into and immediately know that “you are home”. We enjoy the entire process and can’t wait to help you in your search. We understand how important of a move this is for you and we take the time and patience to work with you and make sure you find exactly what you want in a home. Let us take care of all the details and simplify the process for you so that you can just enjoy every minute until “move in day”!
Find us here

Saturday, March 1, 2008

Fargo Real Estate Tips: 8 tips for pricing your home in a buyer's market

Getting ready to sell? The more you know about conditions in your local Fargo Moorhead market, the better your chances of getting the best possible price for your home.

1. Recognize that housing markets are local.

Home prices are like the weather -- very different in different areas.

2. Analyze who is buying and selling in your fargo market.

What's your competition? Who are the buyers, and why are they shopping?

3. Ask the professionals in fargo moorhead.

Don't ignore the elephant in the living room. When you interview real-estate agents, ask about the market conditions for your area and price range.

4. Know what your house is worth.

Talk to a handful of agents. Get an appraisal from a certified professional appraiser. Look at your comparables. Taken together, that information will give you a pretty good idea of what your home is currently worth.

5. Consider strategic pricing.

Here's how it works: If prices in your area are dropping 1% each month, and you want to sell within the next three months, you take 3% off your price right off the bat. So if you were going to put your home on the market for $400,000, you set the price at roughly $388,000.

6. Rebate your "commission."

If you're selling it yourself and need to move quickly, consider subtracting half of what would have been the commission from the sale price. The standard commission is about 7%, so if you subtract 3%, your $300,000 house would go on the market for $291,000, he says.

7. Evaluate whether you really have to sell now.

8. Assess the market where you plan to buy.

If you're selling one house and buying another, look at the market where you plan to move. "It might be that, with the housing there, it's a great time to buy."

Find a new home.

Move to west fargo ND, North Dakota housing Development, and a west fargo resources.

Monday, February 18, 2008

Fargo Real Estate: Price appreciation as of Sept. 30 in housing.

Fargo Nationwide is 134 in home price appreciation. Fargo real estate is up 31.93% over the past five years. Up 2.9% this year alone.


Move to west fargo, North Dakota housing Development, and a west fargo resources.

Thursday, February 7, 2008

Fargo Real Estate: 5 REASONS TO BUY

5 REASONS TO BUY
1. Prices in the neighborhood you are interested in are relatively stable. Either they are holding their own or increasing, or the pace of decline is slowing significantly. If you have to move and don't like apartments, the small penalty you pay for missing the bottom may not mean much.

2. You plan to stay in the home for more than five years. If you can stick it out that long before selling, economists say you’ll probably ride out any downturn and come out ahead on price.

3. Your rent rivals a mortgage payment. If you can afford to buy, it can give you one bonus that renting can't: the mortgage-interest deduction on your taxes.

4. You've found the right house in the right area for you. The schools are great. You love the area and know it would be hard to find another house like the one you have your eye on. In a better market, you would most likely have much more competition for that home.

5. You've built equity in your house and are moving to a place where homes are cheaper. In your new market, your money will go a lot further.

5 REASONS TO HOLD OFF
1. You've lived in your house less than two years. Chances are you haven't had enough time to accumulate equity in your home. Indeed, you may have negative equity, if you live in many areas such as California, Florida, Arizona or Nevada.

2. Your job security is uncertain. If your company or business is in distress, it's probably better to stay put until the smoke clears.

3. You don't plan to stay in your next house at least five years. While it's not important to buy at the exact bottom of the market, it is important to stay long enough to ride it out completely.

4. You don't have good credit or a decent down payment. Do you have a job and income you can document? As a result of the subprime lending crisis, lenders are much more careful about whom they're giving their money to.

5. You have an existing home to sell in a neighborhood where prices are dropping precipitously or where the number of foreclosures is spiking. In this climate, you're probably better off waiting out the storm.
Start here to find fargo real estate
Move to west fargo, North Dakota housing Development, and a west fargo resources.

Monday, January 7, 2008

Fargo Real Estate: When I find the home I want, how much should I offer?

Answer: Again, your fargo Moorhead Real Estate broker can help you here. But there are several things you should consider: 1) is the asking price in line with prices of similar homes in the area? 2) Is the home in good condition or will you have to spend a substantial amount of money making it the way you want it? You probably want to get a professional home inspection before you make your offer. Your real estate broker can help you arrange one. 3) How long has the home been on the market? If it's been for sale for awhile, the seller may be more eager to accept a lower offer. 4) How much mortgage will be required? Make sure you really can afford whatever offer you make. 5) How much do you really want the home? The closer you are to the asking price, the more likely your offer will be accepted. In some cases, you may even want to offer more than the asking price, if you know you are competing with others for the house. Take full advantage of all your realtors resources.
Find a Fargo Professional Here for more info.

Sunday, September 30, 2007

Fargo Real Estate: Welcome to the Valley.... Renaissance Women


Record Number of women buying homes If you're a single woman in Fargo who wants to buy a house, the good news is the market is wide open for you. The stats from the Joint Center for Housing Studies say:

More than one in five home buyers is a single woman.
Twice as many unmarried women are buying homes than single men.
Single women make up more than one-third of the growth in real estate ownership since 1994.

Top Three Reasons Unmarried / Single Women Buy a Home

Strong desire to own her own home.
Need more space or want smaller home.
Relocate closer to job, school or family.

Real Women Who Buy Real Homes

Women home buyers come in all sizes, shapes and ages. They are divorced, never married, separated, widowed; some have children, others live with friends or partners and many live alone.

Trends for Single Women Home Buyers

*3 out of 4 women spend less than $200,000.

*Prefer 2 bedrooms or more.

*Less likely to choose new construction.

*Buy in city over suburban areas.

*Will compromise size & cost to get other amenities.

*Will not compromise on location or quality of neighborhood.

*Prefer condominiums over single family homes.

*Smaller spaces are acceptable.

*Desire security and / or gated access.

*Like to engage in social interaction with neighbors.

*Want close proximity to stores, shopping and fitness centers.


Fargo Real Estate: Helping Kids with the Move

Although relocating can be one of life's challenges, it is also an adventure. By guiding your child through this experience with knowledge and patience, the transition can be a piece of cake!

The home you are moving from may be the only one your child has ever known. There's a sense of familiarity there, not only with the house, but everything around it. The neighborhood friends, parks, and schools will no longer exist for them. That's why moving can be especially
troubling for children. But if parents understand what their child's concerns and needs are, a lot of distress can be avoided.

What are your kids concerned about?
· Preschool children tend to worry about being left behind or separated from their parents.
· Kids aged 6 to 12 can be concerned with how their daily routines will be affected.
· Teenagers are concerned primarily with fitting in and having their social life disrupted.

Ideas for easing their concerns include: Communicate with your child about what the new house will be like. Take them on a visit of the new home and neighborhood, but if you can't, take lots of pictures or videotape it to make them feel more comfortable with their future
surroundings.

Get information on the schools and childcare available in fargo moorhead. If you can, visit the school with your child and meet some of the teachers.
Try to get your child involved in the moving process. Have them pack some of their own special belongings and younger children can decorate the box with stickers and/or markers. Be sure to keep this "box of necessities" close at hand during the move.

Make plans together on how to decorate their room. You may want to leave their surroundings the same, but this could also be a great time for change. Maybe let them pick a color of paint for their new room or a new bed set.

Ask your child what some of the favorite things in their life now are and try to make those happen at the new house.

Most kids will have lots questions, so answer them in a positive way and be understanding of the fears they're facing. Focus on things for them to look forward to, like a first snow or their own room!

Starting over in a new place is never easy even in a great city like Fargo. If possible, find pen pals in the new location before you move so your child will have someone to interact with and learn about the area.

Contacting the Fargo Moorhead Chamber of Commerce for pamphlets on the area is another great way for your family to sit down together and visualize what the new town will be like Leaving friends behind may be one of the harder things your child has to do. Throw a going away party with their friends and take lots of pictures to make a nice scrapbook for them to look back on. Give them a stationary set or prestamped cards so they can stay in touch with friends too.

Just think, when you relieve the stress your children are feeling, you reduce your own stress and are able to focus more on other aspects of your move!

Sponsored By:
FM Realtors.netMove to west fargo, North Dakota housing Development, and a west fargo resources.

Thursday, September 27, 2007

Fargo Moorhead Culture






Marquee of the Fargo Theater in downtown Fargo
Fargo offers a relatively wide variety of cultural opportunities for a city of its size. This is likely due, in part, to the presence of three universities in the metropolitan area. Most theatre and events are either promoted or produced by the universities, although there are a few private theatre companies in the city including Fargo-Moorhead Community Theatre (FMCT), Theatre 'B' in downtown Fargo, Ursa Major Theatre Company, and The Entertainment Company. Music organizations in the metropolitan area include the Fargo-Moorhead Opera, the Jazz Arts Group, the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra, and the Fargo-Moorhead Youth Symphony.
The Fargo Theatre is a restored 1926 Art Deco movie house that features first-run movies, film festivals, and other community events. The Fargodome routinely host concerts, Broadway musicals, dance performances, sporting events, as well as fairs and other gatherings
The Plains Art Museum is the largest museum of art in the state. It is located in downtown Fargo and features regional and national exhibits. It also houses a large permanent collection of art. There are several other museums in Fargo including The Children's Museum at Yunker Farm, The Fargo Air Museum, The Courthouse Museum, The Roger Maris Museum in West Acres Shopping Center, and the North Dakota State University Wall of Fame in the Scheels All Sports store.
The Fargo Public Library was established in 1900 and for many years was housed in a Carnegie-funded building. In 1968, the library moved into a new facility as part of urban renewal efforts in the downtown area. In 2002, the Fargo Public Library established the first branch library in North Dakota with the opening of the Southpointe Branch. In 2004, voters passed a 18-month sales tax measure for new library facilities with 62% of voters in favor. As a result of this vote, the new Northport Branch opened in 2006, the expanded Dr. James Carlson Library will replace the current Southpointe Branch in late 2007, and a new main library downtown is scheduled to open in 2008.
Sponsored By
FM Realtors

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Important Information When Starting the Home Buying Process in Fargo Moorhead Real Estate

One of the most common misconceptions that is shared by a large number of home buyers is that when working with a Real Estate Agent, he or she will "automatically" represent you as a buyer. As we will discuss, unless this is specifically disclosed in writing, in all probability the Agent will be representing the seller.

The traditional relationship (probably going back to when the first thatched hut was sold by someone other than its owner) has been that a Real Estate Agent's primary loyalty was to the seller of the property. This relationship was in effect whether the Agent was the listing agent or working with a buyer. This situation caused many home buyers to be confused: they assumed that the Agent that had been driving them around showing them houses for the last 3 weeks was representing them. In reality, the Agent was representing the owners of the houses they saw, and was bound to reveal to those owners any information he or she knew about the buyers.

Buyer Agency, which is almost universally available now, changed all that. The buyer now often has a choice in representation: the Agent with whom they were working could continue to represent the seller in the transaction, or the Agent could represent them as buyers. The buyer is now able to compete on a more level playing field.

Although there are state to state variations (please verify the situation in your particular locality), the following is a basic summary of the types of agency, and who the Agent represents.

SELLER AGENCY: The "default" situation. Unless disclosed to the contrary, all Agents involved in a Real Estate transaction (and their Brokers--with whom a listing agreement is actually with) represent, and owe their allegiance, to the seller. If you contact an Agent who has a property listed, that Agent will always represent the seller.

BUYER AGENCY: When an Agent represents the buyer, that Agent "rejects" the implicit seller agency and thus owes loyalty to the buyer. For more information on this subject, see the section devoted to Buyer Agency.

DUAL AGENCY: This occurs when 2 Agents--or the same Agent--working for the same Broker each represent a buyer and a seller in a transaction. This situation must be disclosed to both the buyer and the seller. Privileged information (e.g. the price that a buyer will pay or a seller will sell at) cannot be disclosed to the other party without the express permission of that party.

The future Looks Bright in Fargo Moorhead Real Estate

Buying A New Home in The fargo Moorhead Area

Dear Future Homeowner:

Homeownership is becoming a reality for more and more Americans even in the Red River Valley. During 2000, the US homeownership rate reached 67.7%, the highest rate ever. Yet many Americans don't realize that homeownership is within their grasp.

A home in fargo is a financial asset and more: it's a place to live and raise children; it's a plan for the future; it's an investment in your community. That's why we at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development want all Americans to have an opportunity to enjoy the benefits of owning a home. And we are especially proud of our work to help first-time homebuyers: thanks to our special programs, more than 81% of FHA-insured loans went to first-time homebuyers during 2000.

Knowledge is said to open doors. This is literally true when it comes to buying a home. To become a first-time homebuyer, you need to know where and how to begin the homebuying process. The following questions and answers have been carefully selected to give you a foundation of basic knowledge. In addition to helping you begin, this brochure will give you the tools necessary to navigate the entire process - from deciding whether you're ready to buy, all the way to that final proud step, getting the keys to your new home.

If you are ready, contact a real estate agent, lender, or a housing counseling agency. They can help you decide your next step.


Good Luck!


Move to west fargo, North Dakota housing Development, and a west fargo resources.

Areas included are

Dilworth, Hawley, Glyndon, Hitterdal, Hendrum, Lake Park Audubon Audobon, Cormorant Lakes, Detroit Lakes, Sabin, Downer, Rollag, Vergus, Pelican Rapids, Felton, Georgetown, Perley, in Minnesota and West Fargo 58078, Mapleton 58059, Casselton 58012, Prosper, Gardner, Grandin, Argusville, Kindred 58051, Colfax, Christine, Davenport 58021, Leonard, Hillsboro 58045, Hope 58046, Page 58064, Arthur 58006, Absaraka 58002, Wheaton, Horace, Harwood, Hunter, Reiles Acres, Frontier, Prairie Rose, Amenia, and Hickson Oxbow North Dakota